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C. Everett Koop God Bless and Goodbye

 C. Everett Koop,

C. Everett Koop,who raised the profile of the surgeon general  has died in New Hampshire at age 96.God bless you sir we will miss you

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2013 in history, Life, politics

 

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Grand Central centennial

Grand Central centennial

 

 

Happy 100yrs

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2013 in history

 

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HISTORY OF THE CHRISTMAS TREE part 5

The American Tree

In America, Christmas Trees were introduced into several pockets – the German Hessian Soldiers took their tree customs in the 18th century. In Texas, Cattle Barons from Britain took their customs in the 19th century, and the East Coast Society copied the English Court tree customs.

Settlers from all over Europe took their customs also in the 19th century. Decorations were not easy to find in the shanty towns of the West, and people began to make their own decorations. Tin was pierced to create lights and lanterns to hold candles which could shine through the holes. Decorations of all kinds were cutout, stitched and glued. The General Stores were hunting grounds for old magazines with pictures, rolls of Cotton Batting (Cotton Wool), and tinsel, which was occasionally sent from Germany or brought in from the Eastern States. The Paper ‘Putz’ or Christmas Crib was a popular feature under the tree, especially in the Moravian Dutch communities which settled in Pennsylvania.

The British tree in the 20th century

After Queen Victoria died, the country went into mourning, and the tree somehow died with her for a while in many homes. While some families and community groups still had large tinsel strewn trees, many opted for the more convenient table top tree. These were available in a variety of sizes, and the artificial tree, particularly the Goose Feather Tree, became popular. These were originally invented in the 1880’s in Germany, to combat some of the damage being done to Fir trees in the name of Christmas.

In America, the Addis Brush Company created the first brush trees, using the same machinery which made their toilet brushes! These had an advantage over the feather tree in that they would take heavier decorations.

After 1918, because of licensing and export problems, Germany was not able to export its decorations easily. The market was quickly taken up by Japan and America, especially in Christmas Tree lights.

Britain’s Tom Smith Cracker Company which has exported Christmas goods for over three decades, began to manufacture trees themselves for a short while.

In the 1930’s There was a revival of Dickensian nostalgia, particularly in Britain. Christmas cards all sported Crinoline ladies with muffs and bonnets popular in the 1840’s. Christmas Trees became large, and real again, and were decorated with many bells, balls and tinsels, and with a beautiful golden haired angel at the top. But wartime England put a stop to many of these trees. It was forbidden to cut trees down for decoration, and with so many raids, many people preferred to keep their most precious heirloom Christmas tree decorations carefully stored away in metal boxes, and decorated only a small tabletop tree with home-made decorations, which could be taken down into the shelters for a little Christmas cheer, when the air-raid sirens went.

Large trees were erected however in public places to give morale to the people at this time.

Postwar Britain saw a revival of the nostalgic again. people needed the security of Christmas, which is so unchanging in a changing world, as one of the symbols to set them back on their feet. Trees were as large as people could afford. Many poorer families still used the tabletop Goosefeather trees, Americas Addis Brush Trees were being imported into Britain, and these became immensely popular for a time. But the favourites were still real trees. The popular decorations were all produced by a British manufacturer, Swanbrand. and sold by FW Woolworth in Britain. Translucent plastic lock together shapes, Honeycomb paper Angels, ‘glow-in the -dark icicles; also Polish glass balls and birds In South Wales, where real trees were often difficult to find in the rural areas, Holly Bushes were decorated.

The mid-1960’s saw another change. A new world was on the horizon, and modernist ideas were everywhere. Silver aluminium trees were imported from America. The ‘Silver Pine’ tree, patented in the 1950’s, was designed to have a revolving light source under it, with coloured gelatine ‘windows, which allowed the light to shine in different shades as it revolved under the tree. No decorations were needed for this tree.

Decorations became sparse. Glass balls and lametta created an ‘elegant’ modern tree. Of course, many families ignored fashion and carried on putting their own well loved decorations on their trees!

America made a return to Victorian nostalgia in the 1970’s, and it was a good decade later that Britain followed the fashion. By the at first this was a refreshing look, and manufacturers realising the potential created more and more fantastic decorations. Some American companies specialised in antique replicas, actually finding the original makers in Europe to recreate wonderful glass ornaments, real silver tinsels and pressed foil ‘Dresdens’.

Real Christmas Trees were popular, but many housewives preferred the convenience of the authentic looking artificial trees which were being manufactured. If your room was big enough, you could have a 14 foot artificial Spruce right there in your living room, without a single dropped needle – and so good that it fooled everyone at first glance. There are even pine scented sprays to put on the tree for that ‘real tree smell’!

The late 1990’s tree has taken the Victorian idea, but with new themes and conceptual designs. The Starry Starry Night Tree, The Twilight Tree, The Snow Queen Tree…..

These trees are still with us – what will the new millennium bring? Well, I do have some inside knowledge – but its a secret! Watch this space!

Christmas_animals_cats2

 
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Posted by on December 20, 2012 in politics

 

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tax breaks that expired this year

Individual tax breaks

— Relief from the Alternative Minimum Tax. The tax is designed to ensure that wealthy people can’t use tax breaks to avoid paying any federal taxes. However, it was never indexed for inflation, so Congress routinely adjusts it to keep it from imposing hefty tax increases on millions of middle-income families. Cost: $132 billion.

— State and local sales tax deduction. Taxpayers can take this itemized deduction instead of deducting state and local income taxes. It is geared for people who live in states without state income taxes: Alaska, New Hampshire, Tennessee, Florida, South Dakota, Washington, Nevada, Texas and Wyoming. Cost: $4.4 billion.

— A deduction of up to $4,000 for qualified higher education expenses: Cost: $4.2 billion.

— A tax credit for improvements to make homes more energy efficient. Cost: $2.4 billion.

— A provision that allows tax-free distributions from Individual Retirement Accounts, when used for charitable donations. People older than 70-and-a-half can make tax-free withdrawals of up to $100,000 a year from IRAs. Cost: $1.3 billion.

— A deduction for mortgage insurance premiums. Cost: $1.3 billion.

— A deduction of up to $250 for teachers who buy classroom supplies with their own money. Cost: $462 million.

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Business tax breaks

— A tax credit for manufacturers and other businesses that invest in research and development. Cost: $14.3 billion.

— A tax break that allows restaurants and retail stores to write off the cost of certain capital improvements over 15 years instead of 39 years. Cost: $3.7 billion.

— An exemption that allows banks, insurance companies and other financial firms to shield the profits of foreign subsidiaries from being taxed by the U.S. Cost: $11.2 billion.

— A $1 per-gallon tax credit for businesses that use or sell biodiesel, a renewable fuel for diesel engines derived from vegetable oils and animal fats. Cost: $2.2 billion.

— A tax credit of up to $2,400 for businesses that hire people who receive benefits from a variety of government programs, including disability benefits and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families. Cost: $1.8 billion.

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Source: Joint Committee on Taxation.

 
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Posted by on December 20, 2012 in politics

 

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Harry running into trouble

IT SEEMS harry Reid may be running into a little push back on a part of Obama care.The medical device tax which is 2.3 % excise tax. This tax will hit hip replacement to the tampons, Now most would assume that it would be the Republicans but you would be wrong ! It is a group of 18 Democrat senators!!. Now before you get to thinking that they are trying to protect you and I think again most if not all have campaign ties to medical device who have donate to the senator’s campaign or one of the super pack that supported the election of said senator. the names of some of the

Indiana Senator-elect Joe Donnelly

Michigan Senator Debbie Stabenow

Senator Elizabeth Warren

Senator John Kerry

All have large numbers of medical device companies in their states

Medical device Lobby has already spent more than $ 32 million to try to stop this tax.General Electric spent $5.7 million that quarter to lead all medical device lobbyists.

Now when the Republicans tried to repeal this part of Obama care Harry Reid said it was just a Republican attack on Obamacare wonder what harry going to say now!obamacare-logo_full

 
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Posted by on December 13, 2012 in politics, tech

 

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The Ninth Reindeer

The Ninth Reindeer

Rudolph, “the most famous reindeer of all,” was born over a hundred years after his eight flying counterparts. The red-nosed wonder was the creation of Robert L. May, a copywriter at the Montgomery Ward department store.

In 1939, May wrote a Christmas-themed story-poem to help bring holiday traffic into his store. Using a similar rhyme pattern to Moore’s “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas,” May told the story of Rudolph, a young reindeer who was teased by the other deer because of his large, glowing, red nose. But, When Christmas Eve turned foggy and Santa worried that he wouldn’t be able to deliver gifts that night, the former outcast saved Christmas by leading the sleigh by the light of his red nose. Rudolph’s message—that given the opportunity, a liability can be turned into an asset—proved popular. Montgomery Ward sold almost two and a half million copies of the story in 1939. When it was reissued in 1946, the book sold over three and half million copies. Several years later, one of May’s friends, Johnny Marks, wrote a short song based on Rudolph’s story (1949). It was recorded by Gene Autry and sold over two million copies. Since then, the story has been translated into 25 languages and been made into a television movie, narrated by Burl Ives, which has charmed audiences every year since 1964.Rudolph-Red-Nosed-Reindeer-red-nose

 
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Posted by on December 8, 2012 in animals, history, Life, music

 

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A Santa by Any Other Name

A Santa by Any Other Name

18th-century America’s Santa Claus was not the only St. Nicholas-inspired gift-giver to make an appearance at Christmastime. Similar figures were popular all over the world. Christkind or Kris Kringle was believed to deliver presents to well-behaved Swiss and German children. Meaning “Christ child,” Christkind is an angel-like figure often accompanied by St. Nicholas on his holiday missions. In Scandinavia, a jolly elf named Jultomten was thought to deliver gifts in a sleigh drawn by goats. English legend explains that Father Christmas visits each home on Christmas Eve to fill children’s stockings with holiday treats. Pere Noel is responsible for filling the shoes of French children. In Russia, it is believed that an elderly woman named Babouschka purposely gave the wise men wrong directions to Bethlehem so that they couldn’t find Jesus. Later, she felt remorseful, but could not find the men to undo the damage. To this day, on January 5, Babouschka visits Russian children leaving gifts at their bedsides in the hope that one of them is the baby Jesus and she will be forgiven. In Italy, a similar story exists about a woman called La Befana, a kindly witch who rides a broomstick down the chimneys of Italian homes to deliver toys into the stockings of lucky children.ma513_pere_noel_russe1

 
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Posted by on December 7, 2012 in politics

 

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