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Yet another solar panel factory failure

Solar-Panel-

Yet another solar panel factory failure. It seems that SoloPower is slowly circling the drain and on its way out they can call it “restructures operations” all they want but when their top Chief Technology Officer Mustafa Pinarbasi hitting the road and accepting a similar role at another California startup it’s not a good sign.Then we have Craig Cornelius, a managing director for SoloPower’s key private investor, New Jersey-based Hudson Clean Energy Partners, also resigned recently it looks to me like all the fat rats or getting out-of-town.

The sad part of this is The company, which state business recruiters won over in 2011, already has received a $10 million state energy loan backed in part by Portland funding and a $20 million manufacturing Business Energy Tax Credit that will pay $13.5 million in cash. The company is ultimately in line to benefit from nearly $58 million in state and local incentives, including tax breaks, a tax credit and loans will this pull it back , I don’t think so if its past is any kind of sign, The first line of product was supposed to slated for completion in April 2012. But missed goals forced executives to renegotiate a $197 million federal loan guarantee in January, The Oregonian reported earlier this month so I think this company will fail I could be wrong we will see.

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Posted by on February 28, 2013 in tech

 

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Possible Layoff or Worse at Nanosolar

It sounds like another solar company may be on its way out. An anonymous caller to the San Jose Mercury News said Monday that Nanosolar laid off 75 percent of its workforce Friday.As of yet no one has been able to confirm this, all we have is Susan Lehman, a public relations for the company wrote this “Nanosolar did experience a workforce reduction last week, At this time, the company is in a quiet period and will not be issuing any formal statements.”Now, folks, I hate to beat a maybe dead horse but a statement like that is something I would expect out of a grade school teacher, not a solar power company.As far I can find there are no government grants/loans to Nanosolar but I’m still checking that out. But there are some big hitters that have invested into Nanosolar that may be taking a hit Investors included Mohr Davidow Ventures, OhanaHoldings LLC and Arsenal Venture Partners,input 70 million into the company in June of 2012.

The sad truth is back in Feb of 2012 Nanosolar was considered a long shot as a start-up. A report released last Jan of 2012 by Lux Research said as much. I will update this as I find out more

Solar-Panel-

 

 
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Posted by on February 19, 2013 in tech

 

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NASA space shuttle

January 5, 1972 – President Richard Nixon signed a bill approving $5.5 billion over six years to build and test the NASA space shuttle08pd0242

 
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Posted by on January 6, 2013 in history, politics

 

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HISTORY OF THE CHRISTMAS TREE part 5

The American Tree

In America, Christmas Trees were introduced into several pockets – the German Hessian Soldiers took their tree customs in the 18th century. In Texas, Cattle Barons from Britain took their customs in the 19th century, and the East Coast Society copied the English Court tree customs.

Settlers from all over Europe took their customs also in the 19th century. Decorations were not easy to find in the shanty towns of the West, and people began to make their own decorations. Tin was pierced to create lights and lanterns to hold candles which could shine through the holes. Decorations of all kinds were cutout, stitched and glued. The General Stores were hunting grounds for old magazines with pictures, rolls of Cotton Batting (Cotton Wool), and tinsel, which was occasionally sent from Germany or brought in from the Eastern States. The Paper ‘Putz’ or Christmas Crib was a popular feature under the tree, especially in the Moravian Dutch communities which settled in Pennsylvania.

The British tree in the 20th century

After Queen Victoria died, the country went into mourning, and the tree somehow died with her for a while in many homes. While some families and community groups still had large tinsel strewn trees, many opted for the more convenient table top tree. These were available in a variety of sizes, and the artificial tree, particularly the Goose Feather Tree, became popular. These were originally invented in the 1880’s in Germany, to combat some of the damage being done to Fir trees in the name of Christmas.

In America, the Addis Brush Company created the first brush trees, using the same machinery which made their toilet brushes! These had an advantage over the feather tree in that they would take heavier decorations.

After 1918, because of licensing and export problems, Germany was not able to export its decorations easily. The market was quickly taken up by Japan and America, especially in Christmas Tree lights.

Britain’s Tom Smith Cracker Company which has exported Christmas goods for over three decades, began to manufacture trees themselves for a short while.

In the 1930’s There was a revival of Dickensian nostalgia, particularly in Britain. Christmas cards all sported Crinoline ladies with muffs and bonnets popular in the 1840’s. Christmas Trees became large, and real again, and were decorated with many bells, balls and tinsels, and with a beautiful golden haired angel at the top. But wartime England put a stop to many of these trees. It was forbidden to cut trees down for decoration, and with so many raids, many people preferred to keep their most precious heirloom Christmas tree decorations carefully stored away in metal boxes, and decorated only a small tabletop tree with home-made decorations, which could be taken down into the shelters for a little Christmas cheer, when the air-raid sirens went.

Large trees were erected however in public places to give morale to the people at this time.

Postwar Britain saw a revival of the nostalgic again. people needed the security of Christmas, which is so unchanging in a changing world, as one of the symbols to set them back on their feet. Trees were as large as people could afford. Many poorer families still used the tabletop Goosefeather trees, Americas Addis Brush Trees were being imported into Britain, and these became immensely popular for a time. But the favourites were still real trees. The popular decorations were all produced by a British manufacturer, Swanbrand. and sold by FW Woolworth in Britain. Translucent plastic lock together shapes, Honeycomb paper Angels, ‘glow-in the -dark icicles; also Polish glass balls and birds In South Wales, where real trees were often difficult to find in the rural areas, Holly Bushes were decorated.

The mid-1960’s saw another change. A new world was on the horizon, and modernist ideas were everywhere. Silver aluminium trees were imported from America. The ‘Silver Pine’ tree, patented in the 1950’s, was designed to have a revolving light source under it, with coloured gelatine ‘windows, which allowed the light to shine in different shades as it revolved under the tree. No decorations were needed for this tree.

Decorations became sparse. Glass balls and lametta created an ‘elegant’ modern tree. Of course, many families ignored fashion and carried on putting their own well loved decorations on their trees!

America made a return to Victorian nostalgia in the 1970’s, and it was a good decade later that Britain followed the fashion. By the at first this was a refreshing look, and manufacturers realising the potential created more and more fantastic decorations. Some American companies specialised in antique replicas, actually finding the original makers in Europe to recreate wonderful glass ornaments, real silver tinsels and pressed foil ‘Dresdens’.

Real Christmas Trees were popular, but many housewives preferred the convenience of the authentic looking artificial trees which were being manufactured. If your room was big enough, you could have a 14 foot artificial Spruce right there in your living room, without a single dropped needle – and so good that it fooled everyone at first glance. There are even pine scented sprays to put on the tree for that ‘real tree smell’!

The late 1990’s tree has taken the Victorian idea, but with new themes and conceptual designs. The Starry Starry Night Tree, The Twilight Tree, The Snow Queen Tree…..

These trees are still with us – what will the new millennium bring? Well, I do have some inside knowledge – but its a secret! Watch this space!

Christmas_animals_cats2

 
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Posted by on December 20, 2012 in politics

 

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HISTORY OF THE CHRISTMAS TREE part 4

The Victorian and Albert Tree

In 1846, the popular Royals, Queen Victoria and her German Prince, Albert, were illustrated in the Illustrated London News. They were standing with their children around a Christmas Tree. Unlike the previous Royal family, Victoria was very popular with her subjects, and what was done at Court immediately became fashionable – not only in Britain, but with fashion-conscious East Coast American Society. The English Christmas Tree had arrived!

Decorations were still of a ‘home-made’ variety. Young Ladies spent hours at Christmas Crafts, quilling snowflakes and stars, sewing little pouches for secret gifts and paper baskets with sugared almonds in them. Small bead decorations, fine drawn out silver tinsel came from Germany together with beautiful Angels to sit at the top of the tree. Candles were often placed into wooden hoops for safety.

Mid-Victorian Tree

In 1850’s Lauscha began to produce fancy shaped glass bead garlands for the trees, and short garlands made from necklace ‘bugles’ and beads. These were readily available in Germany but not produced in sufficient quantities to export to Britain. The Rauschgoldengel was a common sight. Literally, ‘Tingled-angel’, bought from the Thuringian Christmas markets, and dressed in pure gilded tin.

The 1860’s English Tree had become more innovative than the delicate trees of earlier decades. Small toys were popularly hung on the branches, but still most gifts were placed on the table under the tree.

Around this time, the Christmas tree was spreading into other parts of Europe. The Mediterranean countries were not too interested in the tree, preferring to display only a Creche scene. Italy had a wooden triangle platform tree called as ‘CEPPO’. This had a Creche scene as well as decorations.

The German tree was beginning to suffer from mass destruction! It had become the fashion to lop off the tip off a large tree to use as a Christmas Tree, which prevented the tree from growing further. Statutes were made to prevent people having more than one tree.

Just as the first trees introduced into Britain did not immediately take off, the early trees introduced into America by the Hessian soldiers were not recorded in any particular quantity. The Pennsylvanian German settlements had community trees as early as 1747.

America being so large, tended to have ‘pockets’ of customs relating to the immigrants who had settled in a particular area, and it was not until the communications really got going in the 19th century, that such customs began to spread. Thus references to decorated trees in America before about the middle of the 19th century are very rare.

By the 1870’s, Glass ornaments were being imported into Britain from Lauscha, in Thuringia. It became a status symbol to have glass ornaments on the tree, the more one had, the better ones status! Still many home-made things were seen. The Empire was growing, and the popular tree topper was the Nation’s Flag, sometimes there were flags of the Empire and flags of the allied countries. Trees got very patriotic.

They were imported into America around 1880, where they were sold through stores such as FW Woolworth. They were quickly followed by American patents for electric lights (1882), and metal hooks for safer hanging of decorations onto the trees (1892)

High Victorian Trees

The 1880’s saw a rise of the Aesthetic Movement. At this time Christmas Trees became a glorious hotchpotch of everything one could cram on; or by complete contrast the aesthetic trees which were delicately balanced trees, with delicate colours, shapes and style. they also grew to floor standing trees. The limited availability of decorations in earlier decades had kept trees by necessity to, usually table trees. Now with decorations as well as crafts more popular than ever, there was no excuse. Still a status symbol, the larger the tree – the more affluent the family which sported it.

The High Victorian of the 1890’s was a child’s joy to behold! As tall as the room, and crammed with glitter and tinsel and toys galore. Even the ‘middleclasses’ managed to over-decorate their trees. It was a case of ‘anything goes’. Everything that could possibly go on a tree went onto it.

By 1900 themed trees were popular. A colour theme set in ribbons or balls, a topical idea such as an Oriental Tree, or an Egyptian Tree. They were to be the last of the great Christmas Trees for some time. With the death of Victoria in 1903, the Nation went into mourning and fine trees were not really in evidence until the nostalgia of the Dickensian fashion of the 1930’s.victorian-christmas-tree

 
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Posted by on December 19, 2012 in history, Life

 

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Harry running into trouble

IT SEEMS harry Reid may be running into a little push back on a part of Obama care.The medical device tax which is 2.3 % excise tax. This tax will hit hip replacement to the tampons, Now most would assume that it would be the Republicans but you would be wrong ! It is a group of 18 Democrat senators!!. Now before you get to thinking that they are trying to protect you and I think again most if not all have campaign ties to medical device who have donate to the senator’s campaign or one of the super pack that supported the election of said senator. the names of some of the

Indiana Senator-elect Joe Donnelly

Michigan Senator Debbie Stabenow

Senator Elizabeth Warren

Senator John Kerry

All have large numbers of medical device companies in their states

Medical device Lobby has already spent more than $ 32 million to try to stop this tax.General Electric spent $5.7 million that quarter to lead all medical device lobbyists.

Now when the Republicans tried to repeal this part of Obama care Harry Reid said it was just a Republican attack on Obamacare wonder what harry going to say now!obamacare-logo_full

 
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Posted by on December 13, 2012 in politics, tech

 

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Total Bank Failures for 2012 – 50

Hometown Community Bank, Braselton, GA

Citizens First National Bank, Princeton, IL

Heritage Bank of Florida, Lutz, FL

NOVA Bank, Berwyn, PA

Excel Bank, Sedalia, MO

First East Side Savings Bank, Tamarac, FL

GulfSouth Private Bank, Destin, FL

First United Bank, Crete, IL

Truman Bank, St. Louis, MO

Waukegan Savings Bank, Waukegan, IL

Jasper Banking Company, Jasper, GA

Second Federal Savings and Loan Association of Chicago IL

Heartland Bank, Leawood, KS

First Cherokee State Bank, Woodstock, GA

Georgia Trust Bank, Buford, GA

The Royal Palm Bank of Florida, Naples, FL

Glasgow Savings Bank, Glasgow, MO

Montgomery Bank & Trust, Ailey, GA

The Farmers Bank of Lynchburg, Lynchburg, TN

Security Exchange Bank, Marietta, GA

Putnam State Bank, Palatka, FL

Waccamaw Bank, Whiteville, NC

Farmers and Traders State Bank, Shabbona, IL
Carolina Federal Savings Bank, Charleston, SC

First Capital Bank, Kingfisher, OK

Alabama Trust Bank, National Association Sylacauga, AL

Security Bank, National Association, North Lauderdale, FL

Palm Desert National Bank, Palm Desert, CA

Plantation Federal Bank, Pawleys Island SC

Inter Savings Bank, FSB Maple Grove MN

HarVest Bank, Gaithersburg MD

Bank of Eastern Shore, Cambridge MD

Fort Lee Federal Savings Bank, FSB, Fort Lee NJ

Fidelity Bank , Dearborn MI

Premier Bank, Wilmette IL

Covenant Bank & Trust,  Rock Spring GA

New City Bank, Chicago IL

Global Commerce Bank, Doraville GA

Home Savings of America, Little Falls MN

Central Bank of Georgia, Ellaville GA

SCB Bank, Shelbyville IN

Charter National Bank and Trust, Hoffman Estates IL

BankEast, Knoxville TN

Patriot Bank Minnesota, Forrest Lake MN

Tennessee Commerce Bank, Franklin TN

First Guaranty Bank and Trust Company, Jacksonville FL

American Eagle Savings Bank, Boothwyn PA

The First State Bank, Stockbridge GA

Central Florida State Bank, Belleview FL

May be more before the end of the year lets hope not

 
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Posted by on December 2, 2012 in fail

 

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